Last edited by Misho
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

4 edition of Insect herbivory found in the catalog.

Insect herbivory

I. D. Hodkinson

Insect herbivory

by I. D. Hodkinson

  • 173 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Chapman and Hall in London, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Insect-plant relationships.,
  • Insects -- Host plants.,
  • Insects -- Food.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementI.D. Hodkinson and M.K. Hughes.
    SeriesOutline studies in ecology
    ContributionsHughes, M. K.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL496 .H63 1982
    The Physical Object
    Pagination77 p. :
    Number of Pages77
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3489800M
    ISBN 100412238705
    LC Control Number82009525

    Book: Insect herbivory. pp pp. ref Abstract: This review of insect herbivory herbivory Subject Category: Miscellaneous see more details is intended to provide an up-to-date introduction to a rapidly developing field for students, lecturers and research workers in ecology, entomology, crop protection, forestry and agricultural science.   Volume 5 of "Insect-Plant Interactions" is a volume in a series that presents research in the field. Topics covered include chemical changes in plants as a result of insects feeding on their leaves, dynamic elements of the use and avoidance of host plants by tephritid flies as a result of the presence of other flies, floral volatiles in insect biology, endophytic fungi as mediators of plant Cited by: 1.

      Plant and insect sampling were conducted in February , in the second half of the rainy season, when the TDF plants still had leaves and accumulated most of the season’s leaf damage (see Silva et al. , Neves et al. ). These herbivory values correspond to annual leaf area removed in TDFs (see Coley and Barone ).Cited by: 3.   Introduction. Plants and insects have co-evolved continuously since the first appearance of phytophagous insects in the history of life. Insect herbivory forms a critical component in insect–plant co-evolution (Howe and Jander ; Zhao et al. ; Karban ).To avoid damage by insect pests, plants have developed an array of defensive strategies (Zhao et al. ; Karban ; War et al Cited by: 8.

    To investigate whether herbivory-mediated activation of the MYC2-branch of the JA pathway was associated with a concomitant suppression of the ERF-branch, we monitored the expression of PDF and VSP2 in jin1 mutants that are impaired in MYC2 function (Anderson et al., ; Lorenzo et al., ).In Col-0 plants, 24 h of P. rapae feeding resulted in the accumulation of high levels of VSP2 Cited by: Insect-Plant Interactions () DOI link for Insect-Plant Interactions () Insect-Plant Interactions () bookCited by:


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Insect herbivory by I. D. Hodkinson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Timothy D. Schowalter, in Insect Ecology (Third Edition), Publisher Summary. Herbivory, the feeding on living plant parts by animals, is a key ecosystem process that has widely recognized effects on primary production and on vegetation structure and chapter gives an overview of herbivores.

The effect of herbivory depends on herbivore feeding type and intensity. Instant download; Readable on Insect herbivory book devices; Own it forever; Local sales tax included if applicable.

*immediately available upon Insect herbivory book as print book shipments may be delayed due to the COVID crisis.

ebook access is temporary and does not include ownership of the ebook. Only valid for books with an ebook : Springer Netherlands.

Book: All Authors / Contributors: I D Hodkinson; M K Hughes. Find and intensity of insect herbivory.- The consequences of herbivory for the woody plant.- Other effects of insect herbivory.- Insect herbivores and tree rings.- 6 Insect herbivory and the plant community.- Plant community composition and insect abundance.- Insect ecology provides the basic information on how insects interact with their environment.

This chapter explores the applications on ecosystems. Insect ecology also provides a basis for managing complex, often complementary, effects on ecosystem services, such as resource production, cultural values, and supporting or regulating services.

Read "Insect Herbivory" by I. Hodkinson available from Rakuten : Springer Netherlands. Historically, studies on insect herbivory have primarily addressed pest outbreaks, which have indisputable ecological and economic consequences. By contrast, less attention has been paid to background (‘normal’) insect herbivory (BIH), which inflicts minor damage but acts on plants by: from book Integrated Management of Arthropod Pests and Insect Borne Diseases (pp) Plant Defenses Against Insect Herbivory.

Chapter January ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: 1 online resource (77 pages) Contents: Preface Introduction The evolutionary context and its implications Plants as food for insects Variation in the nutritive value of plant tissue Barriers to the use of plant tissues Trace compound barriers Dosage-dependent chemical barriers Insect Herbivory (Outline Studies in Ecology) 1st Edition by I.

Hodkinson (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book Format: Paperback. Insect Outbreaks Revisited is intended for senior undergraduate and graduate students in ecology, population biology and entomology, as well as government and industry scientists doing research on pests, land managers, pest management personnel, extension personnel, conservation biologists and ecologists, and state, county and district foresters.

Kessler, A. & Baldwin, I. Plant responses to insect herbivory: the emerging molecular analysis. Annu. Rev. Plant Biol. 53, From the reviews: "The authors of this book have identified an important and novel area of research.

I would recommend this book for students and researchers who wish to be introduced to the current research and future ideas regarding above and below ground insect herbivory, and the effect on plant community ecology, plant productivity and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.".

Stimulation of Insect Herbivory by Elevated Temperature Outweighs Protection by the Jasmonate Pathway. by Nathan E. Havko 1,2, George Kapali 1,2,3, Michael R.

Das 1,2,3 and Gregg A. Howe 1,2,3,* 1. Department of Energy-Plant Research Laboratory, Author: Nathan E. Havko, George Kapali, Michael R. Das, Gregg A. Howe. The third edition of Insect Ecology: An Ecosystem Approach provides a modern perspective of insect ecology that integrates two approaches traditionally used to study insect ecology: evolutionary and ecosystem.

This integration substantially broadens the scope of insect ecology and contributes to prediction and resolution of the effects of current environmental changes, as these affect and are /5(2).

Insect Herbivory. por I. Hodkinson. Outline Studies in Ecology ¡Gracias por compartir. Has enviado la siguiente calificación y reseña.

Lo publicaremos en nuestro sitio después de haberla : Springer Netherlands. In response to insect feeding on the leaves, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) plants release elevated levels of volatiles, which can serve as a chemical signal that attracts natural enemies of the herbivore to the damaged plant.

Pulse-labeling experiments with [13C]CO2 demonstrated that many of the volatiles released, including the acyclic terpenes (E,E)-[alpha]-farnesene, (E)-[beta]-farnesene. A herbivore is an animal anatomically and physiologically adapted to eating plant material, for example foliage or marine algae, for the main component of its a result of their plant diet, herbivorous animals typically have mouthparts adapted to rasping or grinding.

Horses and other herbivores have wide flat teeth that are adapted to grinding grass, tree bark, and other tough plant. Insect herbivory imposes stress on host plants. This stress may cause an increase in leaf fluctuating asymmetry (FA), which is defined as the magnitude of the random deviations from a.

To offset their sessile life, plants have evolved diverse strategies to survive and adapt to a broad range of biotic and abiotic stresses, including insect herbivory (Howe and Jander, ).Resistance to herbivory is mediated by preexisting physical and chemical barriers, rapidly induced defense mechanisms (Karban and Baldwin, ), and priming for stronger responses to subsequent.

To relate insect herbivores to the observed patterns of herbivory, we carried out a small inventory identifying the most important leaf‐chewing insects within the two sites.

Our overall expectations were that insect herbivory would increase with experimental warming and be highest in the warmer site at the lowest by: Pi Deficiency Leads to Increased Resistance of Plants to Insect Herbivory.

To investigate whether JA accumulation in pho1 shoots had an effect on herbivory, we exposed plants to the generalist insect larvae of S.

30% of the caterpillars feeding on pho survived after 12 d, while the survival rate on Col-0, aos, and coi, as well as the double mutants pho aos and pho Cited by: Defense against predation and herbivory! Prey may escape predators via refugia, through shifts in body size (too big to eat, or two small to be energetically feasible to predate), or through changes in morphology and behavior.!

At the population level, synchronous phenology (e.g., leaf and seed production, insect emergence may satiate predators.!File Size: 4MB.